1. All importer are BOUND to Incoterms (PRE-Arranged, 72 hours/3 days BEFORE leaving foreign port.  fyi:  to calculate  weight  distribution  of  vessel, carrier manifest & ETC.  
a. Such as: Loading onto vessel (Foreign Forwarder/
Issuer of  Bill-of-Lading), Unloading from vessel (US Forwarder/ Issuer  Arrival  Notice of  LCL/ Full) &  warehouse / Port)
b. By you accepting an
Bill-of-Lading  from your vendors (supplier/factory/shippER/shipping-company), you are BOUND to Incoterms (International Commercial Terms)
c. To understand why/what/who importer
MUST pay,  BEFORE/After/DURING  shipping, importer/buyer MUST know  Incoterms (International Commercial Terms).
d.
Incoterms published by International Chamber of Commerce (ICC)  &  recognized by United Nations Commission on International Trade Law  as Global Common Terms.
e. If you don't know your own
Incoterms, contact  ISSUER of  Bill-of-Lading (aka: Bill-of-Sale) Manufacturers  Contract  Agreement (Your supplier/factory/shippER/shipping-co)
e. If you don't know your own
Incoterms, contact  ISSUER of  Bill-of-Lading (aka: Bill-of-Sale) Manufacturers  Contract  Agreement (Your supplier/factory/shippER/shipping-co)


2. Why  CAN'T  importer vendor (supplier/factory/shippER/shipping-company)  arrange US Domestic Trucking,  ISF Filing  & Customs Entry.
a. All ISSUER of Bill-of-Lading (shippER) has contacts with Other US Forwarder & warehouse in US,   BUT, vary LIMITED contact with Domestic Trucker & Customs Agent
b. To arrange Sea shipping, arranger must be Licenses by
FMC.gov (NVOCC / OFF / OTI)  = ISSUER of Bill-of-Lading   &   ISSUER of Arrival Notice.
c. To arrange Domestic Trucking, arranger must be Licenses by
FMCSA.gov (MC# / DOT#) = US Domestic Trucker.
d. To file ISF & Customs Entry, filer must have "
Filer-Code" from US Customs = Customs Agent / Customs Broker.


3. Customs Broker:
a. Customs Broker = Messenger between US Customs & Importer:  To transmits importer info/documents, way it was received from you &
your-vendors, to US customs
b. Customs Broker = is
NOT a Messenger between you & your-vendors (Factory/ Supplier/ Forwarder/ Warehouse/ Shipping-company/ CET-Exam-Site, US Agencies & etc.)
c. Google search to  
Incoterms (International Commercial Terms)  or   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incoterms.


4. To track shipments:
a. Sea shipment (
click here) and  type in your MBL#.  
b. Air shipment (
click here) and type in your AWB#.

NOTE:
-
FCL ( Full Container Load / Full CarLoad )
-
LCL ( Loose Cargo/Container Load(s) / Less-Than-Container Load / Loose CarLoad / NOT full container )  
EXW – Ex Works (named place) The seller makes the goods available at his premises. The buyer is responsible for all charges.
This trade term places the greatest responsibility on the buyer and minimum obligations on the seller. The Ex Works term is often used when making
an initial quotation for the sale of goods without any costs included.
EXW means that a seller has the goods ready for collection at his premises (Works, factory, warehouse, plant) on the date agreed upon.
The buyer pays all transportation costs and also bears the risks for bringing the goods to their final destination

(
EXW is not to be used for any shipment within EAMER or into/out of EAMER, with no exceptions. FCA is the preferred Incoterms®
rule in this case)



FCA – Free Carrier (named places) The seller hands over the goods, cleared for export, into the custody of the first carrier (named by the buyer) at
the named place. This term is suitable for all modes of transport, including carriage by air, rail, road, and containerised / multi-modal sea transport.
This is the correct "freight collect" term to use for sea shipments in containers, whether LCL (less than container load) or FCL (full container load).

FAS – Free Alongside Ship (named loading port) The seller must place the goods alongside the ship at the named port. The seller must clear the
goods for export. Suitable only for maritime transport only but NOT for multimodal sea transport in containers (see Incoterms 2010, ICC publication
715). This term is typically used for heavy-lift or bulk cargo.

FOB – Free on board (named loading port) The seller must themself load the goods on board the ship nominated by the buyer, cost and risk being
divided at ship's rail. The seller must clear the goods for export. Maritime transport only but NOT for multimodal sea transport in containers (see
Incoterms 2010, ICC publication 715). The buyer must instruct the seller the details of the vessel and port where the goods are to be loaded, and
there is no reference to, or provision for, the use of a carrier or forwarder. It does not include Air transport. This term has been greatly misused over
the last three decades ever since Incoterms 1980 explained that FCA should be used for container shipments.


CFR or CNF – Cost and Freight (named destination port) Seller must pay the costs and freight to bring the goods to the port of destination.
However, risk is transferred to the buyer once the goods have crossed the ship's rail. Maritime transport only and Insurance for the goods is NOT
included. Insurance is at the Cost of the Buyer.

CIF – Cost, Insurance and Freight (named destination port) Exactly the same as CFR except that the seller must in addition procure and pay for
insurance for the buyer. Maritime transport only.

CPT – Carriage Paid To (named place of destination) The general/containerised/multimodal equivalent of CFR. The seller pays for carriage to the
named point of destination, but risk passes when the goods are handed over to the first carrier.

CIP – Carriage and Insurance Paid (To) (named place of destination) The containerised transport/multimodal equivalent of CIF. Seller pays for
carriage and insurance to the named destination point, but risk passes when the goods are handed over to the first carrier.

CFR or CNF – Cost and Freight (named destination port) Seller must pay the costs and freight to bring the goods to the port of destination.
However, risk is transferred to the buyer once the goods have crossed the ship's rail. Maritime transport only and Insurance for the goods is NOT
included. Insurance is at the Cost of the Buyer.

CIF – Cost, Insurance and Freight (named destination port) Exactly the same as CFR except that the seller must in addition procure and pay for
insurance for the buyer. Maritime transport only.

CPT – Carriage Paid To (named place of destination) The general/containerised/multimodal equivalent of CFR. The seller pays for carriage to the
named point of destination, but risk passes when the goods are handed over to the first carrier.

CIP – Carriage and Insurance Paid (To) (named place of destination) The containerised transport/multimodal equivalent of CIF. Seller pays for
carriage and insurance to the named destination point, but risk passes when the goods are handed over to the first carrier

DAF – Delivered At Frontier (Deliveplace) This term can be used when the goods are transported by rail and road. The seller pays for transportation
to the named place of delivery at the frontier. The buyer arranges for customs clearance and pays for transportation from the frontier to his factory.
The passing of risk occurs at the frontier.

DES – Delivered Ex Ship (named port) Where goods are delivered ex ship, the passing of risk does not occur until the ship has arrived at the named
port of destination and the goods made available for unloading to the buyer. The seller pays the same freight and insurance costs as he would under
a CIF arrangement. Unlike CFR and CIF terms, the seller has agreed to bear not just cost, but also Risk and Title up to the arrival of the vessel at the
named port. Costs for unloading the goods and any duties, taxes, etc… are for the Buyer. A commonly used term in shipping bulk commodities, such
as coal, grain, dry chemicals - - - and where the seller either owns or has chartered, their own vessel.

DEQ – Delivered Ex Quay (named port) This is similar to DES, but the passing of risk does not occur until the goods have been unloaded at the port
of destination.   (
DAT replaces DEQ.)

DDU – Delivered Duty Unpaid (named destination place) This term means that the seller delivers the goods to the buyer to the named place of
destination in the contract of sale. The goods are not cleared for import or unloaded from any form of transport at the place of destination. The buyer
is responsible for the costs and risks for the unloading, duty and any subsequent delivery beyond the place of destination. However, if the buyer
wishes the seller to bear cost and risks associated with the import clearance, duty, unloading and subsequent delivery beyond the place of
destination, then this all needs to be explicitly agreed upon in the contract of sale.

DAP - Delivered At Place (named destination place) This term means that the seller delivers when the goods are placed at the disposal of the buyer
on the arriving means of transport ready for unloading at the named place of destination. This is exactly what the old Incoterm DDU stipulated. (
DAP
replaces DDU, DES, DAF.)

DDP – Delivered Duty Paid (named destination place) This term means that the seller pays for all transportation costs and bears all risk until the
goods have been delivered and pays the duty. Also used interchangeably with the term "Free Domicile". The most comprehensive term for the buyer.
In most of the importing countries, taxes such as (but not limited to) VAT and excises should not be considered prepaid being handled as a
"refundable" tax. Therefore VAT and excises usually are not representing a direct cost for the importer since they will be recovered against the sales
on the local (domestic) market.
(
DDP is not to be used for any shipment into/out of the EU or other non-EU Customs administrative area. DAP is the preferred Incoterms® rule in this
case. For any shipment within the EU or other non-EU Customs administrative area, DDP is acceptable.)


New arrival incoterms have been discussed in the Incoterms 2010 brought out by the ICC and DAT and DAP have replaced DAF,DES,DEQ and DDU
Given here is a small explanation provided by the ICC Two new Incoterms rules – DAT and DAP – have replaced the Incoterms 2000 rules DAF, DES,
DEQ and DDU

The number of Incoterms® rules has been reduced from 13 to 11. This has been achieved by substituting two new rules that may be used
irrespective of the agreed mode of transport – DAT, Delivered at Terminal, and DAP, Delivered at Place – for the Incoterms® 2000 rules DAF, DES,
DEQ and DDU.

Under both new rules, delivery occurs at a named destination: in DAT, at the buyer’s disposal unloaded from the arriving vehicle (as under the former
DEQ rule); in DAP, likewise at the buyer’s disposal, but ready for unloading (as under the former DAF, DES and DDU rules).

The new rules make the Incoterms® 2000 rules DES and DEQ superfluous. The named terminal in DAT may well be in a port, and DAT can therefore
safely be used in cases where the Incoterms® 2000 rule DEQ once was. Likewise, the arriving “vehicle” under DAP may well be a ship and the named
place of destination may well be a port: consequently, DAP can safely be used in cases where the Incoterms® 2000 rule DES once was. These new
rules, like their predecessors, are “delivered”, with the seller bearing all the costs (other than those related to import clearance, where applicable)
and risks involved in bringing the goods to the named place of destination
Entry@ISFCustomsBroker.com / 800-710-1559.
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